KARNACOLOGY HAS MOVED!

KARNACOLOGY HAS MOVED !

page1screenshot-new

We’re delighted to announce that our discussion forum website Karnacology will now be available from our main Karnac website.

From January 2017 all of the articles, interviews, reviews, and resources from Karnacology will be available direct from Karnac:  please click here.

New blogs from leading voices in the field of therapy and analysis, as well as from exciting new authors and cutting-edge research, will be added each week.

To be notified of the latest blogs and interviews subscribe to the website or Follow us on the website and Facebook.

Permission to Narrate: Explorations in Group Analysis, Psychoanalysis, Culture, by Martin Weegmann

The Origins of Permission to Narrate

Vintage microphone

I’d just finished The World Within the Group (2014) and had several lines of research and chapter drafts that did not find a home in that book. So, without too much of a leap, I thought, why not give birth to a new set of essays?  The more I looked over what I had, I saw an emergent theme, that of human narration and voice, both within psychotherapy, and without, in the wider domain of culture. I just love the general idea that human beings are inherently literary creatures, whose motives, passions, and reasons are expressed in wonderful spontaneous metaphors, analogies, speech acts and stories. So, I guess, I granted myself ‘permission to narrate’, to explore such questions.

Continue reading

The Political Self: Understanding the Social Context for Mental Illness, by Rod Tweedy

How Society Shapes Who We Are

banksy-artwork-collage

The Political Self explores how our social and economic contexts profoundly affect our mental health and well-being, and how modern neuroscientific and psychodynamic research can both contribute to and enrich our understanding of these wider discussions. It therefore looks both inside and outside—indeed one of the main themes of the book is that the conceptually discrete categories of “inner” and “outer” in reality constantly interact, shape, and inform each other. Severing these two worlds, it suggests, has led both to a devitalised and dissociated form of politics, and to a disengaged and disempowering form of therapy and analysis.

Continue reading