Defining Psychoanalysis: Achieving a Vernacular Expression, by Ian Miller

A snapshot of how psychoanalysts are thinking about psychoanalysis

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One of the most productively disruptive events of my adult life was my move from the Upper West Side of Manhattan to Dublin, four years ago. While psychoanalytic lore and literature is full of analysts’ migrations from one place to another  (think of the exodus from Vienna and Berlin and Budapest to London and New York; or of Bion’s late-life move to Los Angeles), the assumption is that the shape, understanding, and articulation of clinical psychoanalysis, of what we do, remain constant.

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On Group Analysis and Beyond, by Anastassios Koukis

Group Analysis as Meta-theory, Clinical and Social Practice, and Art

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On Group Analysis and Beyond records my theoretical and clinical investigations in the domain of group analysis over the past two decades. Its chapters fall into four main parts which re-evaluate the theoretical and meta-theoretical foundations of group analysis, and explore specific issues and phenomena as seen in the operation of the group-analytic group. The book also demonstrates how major mental disturbances such as eating disorders and psychosis can be effectively treated through group analysis, and examines the interrelations of group analysis with issues related to the social unconscious as well as with art, more specifically music.

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Sexual Abuse and the Sexual Offender: Common Man or Monster?, by Barry Maletzky

Challenging the Myths Surrounding Sexual Abuse and Sexual Offenders

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There are few crimes which evoke more horror and loathing than sexual abuse, especially when the victim is a child. Yet in the late 1960s, when I first began a residency in psychiatry, there were also no established evaluation and treatment programs for the sexual offender.

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Brexit, Boris, and Betrayal: How Boarding School Syndrome continues to shape Political Debate, by Nick Duffell

Divided by education, by design, by normalised duplicity, should the UK be surprised to find itself in deep trouble?

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The shocking events, misinformation, betrayals, and back-stabbings of the last month suggest what a thoroughly divided nation we are. We are split along class and education lines in a way Continental Europeans can’t really appreciate. Those I have spoken to recently about Brexit – Dutch, Danish, French and Germans – are both shocked that we sacrificed our position in Europe and outraged by the resignations of the three main players and the ‘business-as-normal’ attitude in our public life.

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The Cross-Cultural Kaleidoscope: A Systems Approach to Coaching, by Jenny Plaister-Ten

How Intercultural Understanding Enriches the Coaching Relationship

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My book, The Cross-Cultural Kaleidoscope, was written over a period of four years, in a pre-Brexit world.  This called for an increase in cultural understanding, thanks to the forces of globalisation, increased mobility and the impact of technology, bringing about multi-cultural societies and new ways of working.

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The Wisdom of Lived Experience, by Maxine K. Anderson

How the ongoing dialogue between the left and right hemispheres constitutes our mental reality

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My book The Wisdom of Lived Experience explores various aspects of the nature of reality and more specifically that of lived experience. In recent years I have become aware that my efforts to learn from theory and from noted colleagues have often meant closing down my experiencing mind and focussing upon the intellectual and the theoretical, rather that upon the more three-dimensional lived experience with my patients and within myself.

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