Why Oedipus did not have an Oedipus complex, by Siegfried Zepf

Oedipus and the Oedipus Complex: A Revision

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During his work on the concept of the Oedipus complex in 1910 Freud took recourse to a literary highlight of early European culture, Sophocles’ drama “Oedipus Tyrannus”. In so doing he unfolded a perspective unfamiliar to contemporary science of the day, and which to the present day remains disturbing in nature whilst at the same time allowing greater access and lucidity to the concept. Despite the fact that the classical conception of the Oedipus complex has undergone modifications it still influences present day psychoanalytic understanding and clinical work.

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White Bird, Black Serpent, Red Book: Exploring the Gnostic Roots of Jungian Psychology through Dreamwork, by Stuart Douglas

The man doth protest too much methinks: Reaffirming Jung’s Gnostic heritage

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Despite denials that would have left Shakespeare’s Queen Gertrude decidedly unconvinced, not to mention his repeated attempts to distance his psychology from anything that might be considered “metaphysical,” Jung could hardly be more deserving of the epithet “Gnostic.” A central aim of this book is to establish that there should be no doubt about the profound influence that the spiritual tradition generally referred to as Gnosticism had on both the formation of analytical psychology as well as Jung’s personal spiritual weltanschauung.

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